A Multi-Sensory Artistic World

This article first appeared in The Independent Newspaper. Read more about #EverythingEastEnd here

Envision a world where artwork is edible. A place where the photographs or paintings hanging on a wall could not only be something for your eyes to consume, but jump onto a plate and become a delicious masterpiece for your stomach. This is the Palette to Palate series, curated by Kara Hoblin of North Fork Art Collective, and held at Bruce and Son’s in Greenport on spontaneously chosen dates.

On Thursday, August 22, I experienced one of the art dinners in the series, titled “Hypnagogia: Weird Dreams.” Hypnagogia is defined as the transitional state between wakefulness and sleep, adding another sense of creative mystery to what was ahead. There were seven paintings on the wall curated by Hoblin. Once the pieces are displayed, chefs Scott Bollman and Brian Russell curate a menu of their own to literally, or symbolically, emulate the art. The final piece in this pyramid of imagination is the wine pairing, done by Channing Daughters Winery.

“The idea is to allow people to connect through their passions,” Hoblin said. “We all put our piece of the puzzle together to create the whole experience: art, wine, food, and people.”

DSC_0027The first of seven pieces was Hoblin’s “Out of Water” acrylic on wood, that was paired with a sashimi dish of watermelon, tuna, and cornabria blossoms. The course was the most literal artistic interpretation of all the dishes, in the shape of a whale, with a bright, floral touch. The ones to follow were more abstract takes, such as with Dennis Chalkin’s “at 33,000 ft,” archival legacy fiber paper photograph.

“It’s strange for me to talk about one image when I’ve taken hundreds of thousands,” said Chalkin. “I’m inspired by life. I always take my camera with me.” A display of thinly sliced peaches graced the plate with whipped goat cheese, symbolizing the clouds in the photograph, along with watercress, and dukkah — an Egyptian condiment consisting of a mixture of herbs, nuts, and spices. Elizabeth Karsch “Sea Robin” acrylic, pastel, oil pastel, and color pencil on wood panel followed and was paired with squash, tomato, and vegetable ash. These three dishes were accompanied by a white, Tocai Friulano wine.

Sarah Satory’s “No Direction, But Not Lost” charcoal and conte on BFK paper piece was complimented by a twist on traditional clam chowder — vegetable, chervil, and truffle, paired with a rose cabernet sauvignon 2018. Carl Timpone’s “Emptiness is Form Metal Print,” was represented with short ribs, depicting rocks, with mushroom, seaweed, potato, and horseradish. Dessert was a cheesecake with blueberry, blue cheese, and yka leaves to emulate the butterflies of Vu’s painting “Letting Go,” acrylic on wood.DSC_0039

“It was about a girl, about a breakup, and letting go,” Vu said. “Facing the reality that identity is completely different. Letting go of a certain identity to create another one.”

Sylvia Channing of Channing Daughters Winery, “7,” was paired with a CBD latte.

Chefs Bollman and Russell mastered the art of turning culinary dreams into a reality in this unique collaboration among likeminded individuals. At the dinner, conversation flowed: discussions of love, passion, invention, and community. Through art, Hoblin has opened up a multi-sensory world where palette and palate intertwine.

Chalk Art: Long Islands Latest Masterpiece

(This article first appeared in the August 24, 2016 issue of The Independent Newspaper- as a prequel to the post write up seen here)

 

Picture the word “love” drawn out in front of your eyes on a black chalk board. Waves, underwater creatures, and flowers all morphed to form the letters L, O, V, and E using every color in the rainbow.

In a single image, that would be artist Kara Hoblin. This Sunday her first chalk art show “The Art of Letting Go” will be held from 6 to 10 PM at the Heron Suites in Southold where guests can view her work while enjoying snacks and refreshments as music plays in the background.

In a continuously growing artistic community, the show at Heron Suites will also include a sign-up sheet for the North Fork Art Collective. In its initial stages, it will be a space for gathering artists to create, discuss, and discover art of all mediums.

“The Art of Letting Go” is appropriately titled after Hoblin’s firm belief in life’s most important lesson.

“[It’s about] the ephemeral nature of chalk and the act of letting go. As an artist to let go of my work, as a lover to let go of heartache, as a person to let go of insecurities, pain, loss, etc.,” she explained.

In keeping with the theme, at the end of the show Hoblin will erase most of the displays with help from the audience as a way to encourage mindfulness and love.

By erasing the chalk guests have an opportunity to experience letting go themselves through this physical outlet. Behind these images will reveal hidden phrases aimed to inspire those in the room. “You can’t have positivity without love. Love of oneself, of everyone around you, of the environment.”

More than chalk, Hoblin explores illustration of all kinds.

“I recently started to get really involved with typography. I find it therapeutic and powerful since language (of all types) is the connecting factor for our species, and communication is both beautiful and necessary.”

Her work is whimsical in style, which she aims to remain true to. While she tries to take on as many projects as she can, they must coincide with her vision.

A native Long Islander from Blue Point, Hoblin worked in New York City at a photo and styling agency after graduating from SUNY New Paltz. While so many are tempted to leave home, Hoblin’s love for the community and nature has been her sense of gravity to the area. In returning back to the island she managed Harbes Vineyard tasting room along with handling their marketing and social media. Her first chalkboard design was at First and South Restaurant in Greenport back in 2014. This spring she has became a full time artist.

Living on the North Fork has become a sanctuary to her. Whether it be swimming at one of the local beaches or going on a peaceful walk through one of the many preserves there are endless locations to relax, think, and draw.

Hoblin’s most beloved activity is simply being outdoors, riding her bike.

In gearing her life’s work to her community, she has compiled dozens of hand drawn sketches of locations throughout the North Fork in a coloring book. Each location is depicted as Hoblin imagines it, a magical collection that’s due to hit shelves in September.

“One of my favorite swimming spots has these large rocks in the water and in the coloring book there’s a mermaid sitting on the rock. I’m really excited and I’ve put a lot of time and effort into this coloring book. I think that coloring and any type of art is really beneficial and stress relieving for the soul.”

In hopes that her first coloring book is successful she plans to release a second edition including various towns across Long Island and even offer customized versions in the future.

In a world where love is as much a vision as it is a feeling, letting go is a form of art.

For artist Kara Hoblin, Long Island is her inspirational masterpiece.

The Colorful Life of Kara Hoblin

Picture the word “love” drawn out in front of your eyes on a black chalk board. Waves, underwater creatures, and flowers all morphed to form the letters L, O, V, and E using every color in the rainbow.

In a single image, that would be artist Kara Hoblin.

“You can’t have positivity without love. Love of oneself, of everyone around you, of the environment.”

Back in August 2016 in Southold, Long Island, Hoblin held her first chalk art show, ‘The Art of Letting Go,’ and created her artistic image after being inspired from our initial interview.

With the intent to erase her work at the end of the evening, to reveal hidden messages below, people showed up from all over, some she barely knew and some she hadn’t seen in years.

John McLane came across Hoblin’s work at different restaurants around Greenpoint before connecting through mutual friends on Facebook and then meeting her in person on the Hampton Jitney.

“I hear her tell her name to the bus driver for the reservation and when she came up the steps I said ‘Hey, nice work!’ She didn’t know my wife and I, so she looked at us very confused. So I said, ‘The chalk drawings.’”

A native Long Islander from Blue Point, Hoblin worked in New York City at a photo and styling agency after graduating from SUNY New Paltz. While so many are tempted to leave home, Hoblin’s love for the community and nature has been her sense of gravity to the area. In returning back to the island she managed Harbes Vineyard tasting room along with handling their marketing and social media. Her first chalkboard design was at First and South Restaurant in Greenport back in 2014.

Owner of First and South, Sarah Phillips, has seen Hoblin undergo a serendipitous transition.

“In a painting she’d be beautiful, well balanced, colorful and stunning almost to a point that it’s sad because you wish that life could be like that every day,” Phillips describes.

Hoblin’s mother, Gina Crawford, described her daughters first exhibit at the young age of three years old when star and flower paintings were displayed in their home.

“At seven, eights years old she did her first exhibit at Bayport-Blue Point library about Beanie Babies. I always knew she was going to be an artist. I’m so proud of her.”

More than chalk, Hoblin explores illustration of all kinds.

“I recently started to get really involved with typography. I find it therapeutic and powerful since language (of all types) is the connecting factor for our species, and communication is both beautiful and necessary.”

Her work is whimsical in style, which she aims to remain true to. While she tries to take on as many projects as she can, they must coincide with her vision.

Living on the North Fork has become a sanctuary to her. Whether it be swimming at one of the local beaches or going on a peaceful walk through one of the many preserves there are endless locations to relax, think, and draw.

Hoblin’s most beloved activity is simply being outdoors. Whether it’s riding her bike, taking a walk with her puppy, Lily, or swimming in the sound.

In gearing her life’s work to her community, she has compiled dozens of hand drawn sketches of locations throughout the North Fork in a coloring book. Each location is depicted as Hoblin imagines it, a magical collection that is available at Burtons Bookstore in Greenport and Love Lane Kitchen in Mattituck. She’s currently working on her second coloring book depicting scenes from the South Shore and Shelter Island.

“One of my favorite swimming spots has these large rocks in the water and in the coloring book there’s a mermaid sitting on the rock. I’m really excited and I’ve put a lot of time and effort into this coloring book. I think that coloring and any type of art is really beneficial and stress relieving for the soul.”

For artist Kara Hoblin, Long Island is her inspirational masterpiece.

You can meet the artist at her next exhibit Wednesday, February 8th, from 6-8pm at Love Lane Kitchen for a reception of selected works and pop up gift shop.

Follow more from Kara Hoblin on Instagram  or her website.

Follow more from me on Facebook, Instagram & Snapchat: NikkiontheDaily

This is a follow up story. The original story about The Art of Letting Go was featured in The Independent Newspaper on August 24, 2016.